Android blood pressure tracking

 

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We’ve selected these apps based on their user reviews, frequent updates, and overall impact in supporting people living with diabetes. If you’d like to suggest an app for this list, email us at [email protected] .

Millions of Americans are living with diabetes — nearly 30 million to be exact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . That’s almost 10 percent of the population.

Android blood pressure tracking

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This content is created by the Healthline editorial team and is funded by a third party sponsor. The content is objective, medically accurate, and adheres to Healthline's editorial standards and policies. The content is not directed, edited, approved, or otherwise influenced by the advertisers represented on this page, with exception of the potential recommendation of the broad topic area.

We’ve selected these apps based on their user reviews, frequent updates, and overall impact in supporting people living with diabetes. If you’d like to suggest an app for this list, email us at [email protected] .

Millions of Americans are living with diabetes — nearly 30 million to be exact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . That’s almost 10 percent of the population.

Normal blood pressure is defined as a systolic BP between 100 and 120 mm Hg and a diastolic BP below 80 mm Hg (in adults over age 18). Prehypertension is present when measured blood pressures are between 120 and 140 mm Hg systolic or between 80 and 90 mm Hg diastolic. When either the systolic pressure exceeds 140 mm Hg or the diastolic exceeds 90 mm Hg, and these values are confirmed on two additional visits, stage I hypertension (high blood pressure) is present. See: illustration

Low blood pressure is sometimes present in healthy individuals, but it indicates shock in patients with fever, active bleeding, allergic reactions, active heart disease, spinal cord injuries, or trauma. Blood pressure should be checked routinely whenever a patient sees a health care provider because controlling abnormally high blood pressure effectively prevents damage to the heart and circulatory system as well as the kidneys, retina, brain, and other organs.

Auscultatory method: Begin as above. After inflating the cuff until the pressure is about 30 mm above the point where the radial pulse disappears, place the bell of the stethoscope over the brachial artery just below the blood pressure cuff. Then deflate the cuff slowly, about 2 to 3 mm Hg per heartbeat. The first sound heard from the artery is recorded as the systolic pressure. The point at which sounds are no longer heard is recorded as the diastolic pressure. For convenience the blood pressure is recorded as figures separated by a slash. The systolic value is recorded first.