Mobile spy reviews 350z xxr 521

 

First impressions last. Wrong. Psychologists say humans develop their strongest positive feelings to someone or something if they hated it at first. For instance, I once detested Hondas. After spending some time driving various Hondas, the brand earned my no-longer-grudging respect. The converse is also true: we reserve our most negative assessments for someone or something that we loved at first. The human psyche doesn't like to be disappointed.  Sadly, the 2003 Ford Thunderbird falls into this latter category.

The history of the T-Bird is littered with hits and misses. It is hard to argue that the "Classic Birds," "Square Birds," "Bullet Birds," "Flair Birds" and "Glamour Birds" of the fifties and sixties aren't momentous automotive designs. And then the seventies happened.

Back when bottoms had bells, Ford sacrificed art for gargantuan proportions, crude boxy angles and shameless badge engineering. During the eighties and nineties, T-Birds regained some lost ground. But the models were so stylistically removed from their classic ancestors that they defied comparison. Literally.

Mobile spy reviews 350z xxr 521

Hunkered down inside the Nissan 350Z Roadster convertible with the top up, you know the way a clam must feel when it looks outside its shell. The top is screwed down like one of those heavy-duty chop jobs on a lead sled of yore. While claustrophobics need not apply, the Z’s powerplant’s guttural moan vibrates through the floorboards and around the metal carcoon in a most sensually satisfying manner. Open the lid and this is what a proper sports car is all about: pure, unadulterated exhilaration.

Of course, there’s nothing “pure” about the 350Z’ looks; the coupe could have been penned by a Cadillac designer on acid. Fortunately, the Z convertible is a different (if equally fantastic) beast. If you have a thing for 1957 and 1958 Porsche Speedsters but want something altogether more modern, this is your scene. Once the top drops, the Z’s basic shape is clean enough that most of us will forgive Nissan for the lid’s afterthought deportment.

Excuse my obsessive-compulsive digression, but I’d like to point out that the lamentable door handles that debuted with the new 350Z remain in situ . The handles– which wouldn’t look out of place on a cheap chest of drawers– ruin the clean concave sweep of the upper portion of the car’s body. What’s more, they’ve been known to open when massaged by automatic car wash rollers. On the other hand, the rear taillights are minor works of art; the red and white plastics fit together like a Piet Mondrian painting.

First impressions last. Wrong. Psychologists say humans develop their strongest positive feelings to someone or something if they hated it at first. For instance, I once detested Hondas. After spending some time driving various Hondas, the brand earned my no-longer-grudging respect. The converse is also true: we reserve our most negative assessments for someone or something that we loved at first. The human psyche doesn't like to be disappointed.  Sadly, the 2003 Ford Thunderbird falls into this latter category.

The history of the T-Bird is littered with hits and misses. It is hard to argue that the "Classic Birds," "Square Birds," "Bullet Birds," "Flair Birds" and "Glamour Birds" of the fifties and sixties aren't momentous automotive designs. And then the seventies happened.

Back when bottoms had bells, Ford sacrificed art for gargantuan proportions, crude boxy angles and shameless badge engineering. During the eighties and nineties, T-Birds regained some lost ground. But the models were so stylistically removed from their classic ancestors that they defied comparison. Literally.

To be considered even halfway decent, every car movie has to have its vehicular villain. Bullitt had the Dodge Charger, Death Proof had the Chevy Nova, and Fast & Furious: Tokyo Drift… well, it had this fifth-generation Nissan Z. Complete with an extensive wide-body aero kit and menacing black-and-grey paint job, this thing comes packing real performance under the hood, which means all that wastegate flutter you hear ain’t just for show. This is the Drift King’s 350Z.

Universal pumped out 11 copies of the car for stunt duties, each bearing the same body kit and large, 19-inch wheels. Most were bought used in Japan and sent to California for modification and filming. However, only two were equipped with turbos, and luckily, both survived film production without getting blown up or stuffed into a wall.

Updated 08/06/2015: This car just went up for sale through Cheshire Classic Cars here, making for one helluva Fast & Furious collectible. However, the future owner will have to be committed, as it’s priced at £149,995 – roughly $233,000 at current exchange rates. Yikes.

The International Geneva Motor Show ( French : Salon international de l'automobile ) is an annual auto show held in March in the Swiss city of Geneva . The show is hosted at the Geneva Palexpo , a convention centre located next to the Geneva Cointrin International Airport . The Salon is organised by the Organisation Internationale des Constructeurs d'Automobiles , and is considered an important major international auto show. [1]

First held in 1905, the Salon has hosted almost all major internal combustion engined models in the history of the automobile , along with benzene- and steam-powered cars from the beginning of the century. Exotic supercars often steal the spotlight during their debuts at the show. Prototypes, new equipment, technical breakthroughs, international partnerships , as well as political and social debates, have been announced at the exhibition. The show is regarded as a level playing field for the world's automakers , aided by the fact Switzerland lacks an auto industry of its own. [2]

The 80th edition of the Geneva Motor Show was held from 4–14 March 2010. Over 80 introductions were expected for the show. [94] Press days for the show started on 2 March 2010, when most of the major introductions occurred.