Android locator d47.org

 

Could you list all possible directories where Android apps may store data, providing description what kind of data are stored in each directory?

All apps (root or not) have a default data directory, which is /data/data/<package_name> . By default, the apps databases, settings, and all other data go here. If an app expects huge amounts of data to be stored, or for other reasons wants to "be nice to internal storage", there's a corresponding directory on the SDCard ( Android/data/<package_name> ).

Apart from that, all apps can store data anywhere on the SDCard, as there are no restrictions -- and many apps do so. They can use directory names freely (and they again do), which is what often makes it hard to decide what all that "junk" on the card is intended for, and what of it can be deleted.

Android locator d47.org

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Could you list all possible directories where Android apps may store data, providing description what kind of data are stored in each directory?

All apps (root or not) have a default data directory, which is /data/data/<package_name> . By default, the apps databases, settings, and all other data go here. If an app expects huge amounts of data to be stored, or for other reasons wants to "be nice to internal storage", there's a corresponding directory on the SDCard ( Android/data/<package_name> ).

Apart from that, all apps can store data anywhere on the SDCard, as there are no restrictions -- and many apps do so. They can use directory names freely (and they again do), which is what often makes it hard to decide what all that "junk" on the card is intended for, and what of it can be deleted.

Google announced last week that it would release a new locator feature for Android devices called Android Device Manager, which helps owners find their lost or stolen phones and tablets. It was supposed to roll out later this month, but in a Google+ posting Wednesday , Google announced its immediate availability.

The feature works similarly to other locator services, like Lookout and Samsung's Find My Mobile , but now you get the feature natively on your Android device. Here's how to get started with Android Device Manager:

On your Android device, go to the Google Settings app, then tap on Android Device Manager. The locator feature is enabled by default, but to enable remote data wipe, tap on the box next to "Allow remote factory reset," then tap "Activate."