Mobile spy soft voice

 

We all love reading spy novels, but sometimes we cringe at how they stretch credibility. The solution: read spy novels written by real-life spies. Here are 16 can’t-miss stories by men and women with first-hand knowledge of spycraft.

In Bearden's 1980s-set novel  “The Black Tulip,” real-life CIA chief William Casey recruits a Russian-born American to guide Afghanistan’s mujahideen against the Soviets. Writes Publishers Weekly: “Bearden soft-pedals the horrors of the war and concentrates on the stringpullers from both sides as KGB and CIA field agents dodge each other and their own hierarchies as they maneuver Afghan and Russian pawns to win the game.”

The Guardian recently wrote that Richard Hannay, the protagonist of 1915’s  “The Thirty-Nine Steps,” is “an appealing antihero, both cool and brave, but also ‘pretty well disgusted with life’ who, caught up in a high-octane international drama, has the resource, intelligence and daring to thwart a naked foreign attempt to drag Britain into war.” Since its debut, the novel has never been out of print.

Mobile spy soft voice

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We all love reading spy novels, but sometimes we cringe at how they stretch credibility. The solution: read spy novels written by real-life spies. Here are 16 can’t-miss stories by men and women with first-hand knowledge of spycraft.

In Bearden's 1980s-set novel  “The Black Tulip,” real-life CIA chief William Casey recruits a Russian-born American to guide Afghanistan’s mujahideen against the Soviets. Writes Publishers Weekly: “Bearden soft-pedals the horrors of the war and concentrates on the stringpullers from both sides as KGB and CIA field agents dodge each other and their own hierarchies as they maneuver Afghan and Russian pawns to win the game.”

The Guardian recently wrote that Richard Hannay, the protagonist of 1915’s  “The Thirty-Nine Steps,” is “an appealing antihero, both cool and brave, but also ‘pretty well disgusted with life’ who, caught up in a high-octane international drama, has the resource, intelligence and daring to thwart a naked foreign attempt to drag Britain into war.” Since its debut, the novel has never been out of print.

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